Artwork. A gold plaque has the following written on it in black text: "This institution has failed to provide disabled individuals with an accessible evacuation plan. In the case of an emergency, this is where my people will die. Please remember us. Please remember me."

In the Stairwell, We Will Die

During my sophomore year of college, I wrote my will. That year was filled with trauma. I’d noticed a constant ache in my lower back that soon trickled down my legs and into my feet. They started to look like
Daytime, an aerial view of Islamabad, Pakistan. It's mostly green tree tops with buildings and roads. Large mountains in the background.

The Many Challenges of Working Disabled Women in Pakistan

In Pakistan, disability has been overlooked and ignored in all aspects of life, including administrative, financial, and legal spheres. As a result, people with disabilities are the most disadvantaged since we are unseen, unheard, and miscounted in the country.  …
A blue, orange and red graphic with solid black text and illustrations. The text in the blue portion reads: "ADA Americans with Disabilities Act." Below that, in the orange and red sections, are solid black illustrations that are meant to symbolize or represent various types of disabilities. Listed in order: signing hands, two arrows pointing to an ear with a device in it, a pair of black glasses, an eye with a line crossed through it, representation of braille text with the word underneath, the traditional wheelchair user symbol, an amputee using a cane, a service dog, a person with a white cane, and a person's head with the brain visible.

Busting Barriers: ADHD and ADA Accommodations at Work

When I speak to other ADHDers who were diagnosed as adults, they share a common refrain: “Why didn’t anybody tell me sooner?” No, it’s not supposed to be hard to sustain friendships or clean the house. In fact, there are…
Two younger, dark-haired people with long hair - one brown-skinned, the other fairer skinned - in a living room. The fairer skinned person, wearing blue scrubs and a stethoscope around their neck, is standing beside the couch where the other person is seated. They're both smiling at the camera as the standing person passes a wooden tray with a white bowl of food and a glass of orange juice to the seated person.

A List of Demands: A Living Wage for Home Care Aids Supports Disabled People

I am angry—angry that Fair Pay for Home Care was not fully funded in New York’s budget in January 2022. And angry that the small pay increase that was approved won’t solve New York’s severe shortage of home care workers.
Michael speaks to camera from a room. On-screen text to the right reads, "We got a priorities problem". The text is in all capital letters and is white with a neon green border.

Seattle Curb Cuts: Accessible for All with Michael

Curb cuts are a relatively simple but important accessibility feature. Yet, they're still uncommon in both rural and urban areas. In his video, Michael discusses the importance of curb cuts.
Thumbnail that shows two people smiling while seated in mountain bike hand cycles. There is an ASL interpreter in the lower right. There is the Rooted in Rights logo, an open captions icon, and an audio description icon in the upper left.

Access to the Outdoors

Access and inclusion are important in the great outdoors too! In this video, people share what access to the outdoors means to them. Funded by the King County Department of Natural Resources and Parks, Wastewater Treatment Division and the Coal Creek Sewer Upgrade Project.
Lyla stands with her cane in front of a giraffe in the giraffe barn

Giraffes Say, “Habitats for All!”

Lyla introduces her friend Dave the Giraffe from Woodland Park Zoo, and shares how people and animals of all abilities and disabilities need different types of habitats.
Hudson in front of a stuffed eagle and other science equipment

Tortoises Say, “Fun for All!”

Hudson introduces his friend Rivera the Tortoise, and talks about his day at the Zoomazium on Sensory Friendly Friday at Woodland Park Zoo, where people of all abilities and disabilities can have fun.
Julian sits in his power chair and raises his arms against a poster of a hawk's wingspan.

Hawks Say, “Help for All!”

Julian introduces his friend Gunnar the Hawk from Woodland Park Zoo, and shares how people and animals of different abilities and disabilities can do all kinds of things when we get the help we need.