Four people on a video call. An ASL interpreter signs in the lower right corner. Rooted in Rights logo and icons for Open Captions and Audio Description are on the left.

Accessible Video Calls

Accessible meetings are effective meetings. Whether you're catching up with a friend or discussing the latest project at work, accessibility ensures that everyone can fully engage and participate. Funded by the King County Department of Natural Resources and Parks, Wastewater Treatment Division and the Coal Creek Sewer Upgrade Project.
A White person with brown wavy hair looks up towards the sky in a forest. There is a Rooted in Rights icon, a Closed Captioning icon, and an Audio Description icon on the left of the image.

Access Nature

The physical, mental, and emotional benefits of access to nature are widely known, yet communities that need these benefits the most are often excluded from outdoor spaces. What does accessibility in the outdoors actually mean, and how can it be improved for all people with disabilities?
Woman on street corner

Traffic Signals that Work for All Pedestrians!

Seattle City Council is considering a resolution to ask Seattle Department of Transportation to create a traffic signals policy that would prioritize pedestrians. Hear Carol explain why this matters, and how slower crossing speeds help pedestrians of all ages
Video still with Rooted in Rights program director, Anna Zivarts with backwards black cap and Rooted in Rights T-shirt

How to Make Your Video Go Viral. Hint: Be an #a11y

With support from the Ford Foundation, we’ve created a detailed guide for making accessible videos. We hope video makers of all levels and abilities will take the time to check it out!
Several cars blocking the curb ramp at the other end of a crosswalk.

Don’t Block the Box

When drivers block the box, it makes the streets more dangerous for everyone.
A person in a wheelchair holding folders and a pen

Identifying as “Disabled” Brings Me Peace in a World Hostile to My Existence

Before I entered college, I never thought about disability. Or at least, I never thought about it with that exact word. Mental illness. Mentally ill. Disorder. Burden. These were all words I used to describe myself before “disabled” and “disability”
A person in a manual wheelchair holds a red laptop in their lap.

Here’s How You Can Show Solidarity to Disabled Classmates

Back-to-school season can be a stressful time for members of the disability community, especially those who are entering new schools and new phases of their educations. Inaccessibility is a constant problem on campuses, and that doesn’t just include physical access…
A silhouette of a person holding his fingers to his lips to shush a silhouette of a person looking up at them.

We Cannot Ignore the Connection Between Disability and Intimate Partner Abuse

This blog post is part of a series in partnership with the Disability Visibility Project® to bring attention to the omission of disability from larger conversations taking place within the #MeToo Movement. Trigger warning: this post discusses abuse, violence, and…

VIDEO: The Right to Your Graduation

It’s the New Year, and that means we are just about six months away from graduation. Graduation is an exciting time to celebrate all of our accomplishments, but what if you can’t attend your own graduation because you have a…