Photo of a woman in a blue jumpsuit standing at a podium on stage, speaking. She is looking up at the lights.

I’m Not Sorry If My Disability Makes You Uncomfortable

I spent the first 30 years of my life doing everything I could to not let people know I couldn’t see things. I ordered the same things at the fast food restaurant, I got dropped off a block away so nobody knew that my parents were driving me, I didn’t follow my dream to study medicine or be a scientist.
Photo of Debra Kahn and her two children with their arms around each other, smiling.

A Deaf-Blind Mother Shares Her Experiences Parenting Two Hearing Children

DEBRA: Hello, my name is Debra Kahn and I am deaf-blind. I’m a white woman. I have medium short brown hair. I’m wearing glasses and I’m wearing a blue sweater top. I’m one of five children and I have four…

Share your Parenting without Pity Story

You can submit your answers here, or leave us a voice message with your response by calling 206.324.1521 x 242  …
Lisa Ferris in a graduation gown. Her mother is helping her adjust her cap. They are standing outside in front of a red vehicle.

How Do You Figure Out Who You Are When You’re the Only Disabled Person in Your Family?

Your glasses scare people,” said my mother, matter-of-factly. The comment stung, but I knew she was correct. We were discussing why, at 16 years-old, I could not get very many babysitting jobs in my suburban neighborhood. My sister had just…
Photo of a young person playing drums. The person's face is not visible, but they are positioned behind the drum set.

How My Parents Helped Me Find My Disabled Identity

I have always loved the way drums sound. During parades, my focus was always on the marchers with the snares; while at concerts my neck was perpetually craned as I struggled to see over the taller members of the crowd
Blue text "Parenting Without Pity." on white background, next to teal logo of parent holding child.

VIDEO: Parenting Without Pity

Parenting Without Pity is a 20-episode podcast series where disabled parents offer compassionate and frank advice and guidance to non-disabled parents of disabled children.
Black and white photo of two people holding hands, one is an older person and one a younger person. The photo is focused just on the hands.

No, I’m Not the Patient: Caring for an Aging Parent When You’re Disabled and Everyone Thinks You’re the One Dying

Caring for an aging (or ill) parent or loved one is always complicated. That subtle shift that takes place over time— where the parent becomes the one being cared for, instead of the other way around. It’s a journey as…
A photo of Anna and her toddler son going down a big red slide together.

My Son’s Disability Taught Me to Be Proud of My Own Disability

When I was born, the doctors told my parents I was blind. That was the first line of my college application essay and the narrative starting point of my life. My parents took me to the doctor because my eyes…

VIDEO: New Disabled Parent Adventures in Advocacy

Happy Mother’s Day! Today is a day where we all celebrate our mothers. But did you know that parents with disabilities are far more at risk of losing custody of their children than non-disabled parents? Removal rates can be as…