Solid colored background with the following text in white font: #EqualPay4OurWork: The Fight to Eliminate the Subminimum Wage. Co-hosted by the National Federation of the Blind (@NFB_voice) and Shaun Bickley (@LeftistAutist). Tuesday, March 5th, 2019 at 3pm EST / 12pm PST

#EqualPay4OurWork Twitter Chat: The Fight to Eliminate the Subminimum Wage

Archive of Twitter Chat When the Fair Labor Standards Act passed in 1938, it included a revolutionary protection:  a minimum wage.  But Section 14(c) of the Act included an exemption allowing some workers – people with disabilities – to be…
A chart with drawings of different body parts highlighted with red circles to indicate pain.

My Knowledge of My Body is Often Ignored When I Seek Medical Care

I walk through the doors behind the front desk of the pain clinic to room number four, the white-walled, two-chaired, one-tabled examination room that looks identical to the room I was in the last time I was here. I fill
Three photos left to right:​ ​Alaina, a thin, young white cane user, standing in the Boston Public Garden with​ her ​lavender cane. ​She is​ wearing a dark blue romper with umbrellas on it and ​she ha​s​ dark brown and purple hair.​ The second is Alaina standing outside with ​her lavender cane. ​She is wearing a colorful Zodiac skirt and a shirt that says "The Future Is Accessible." ​The third is Alaina ​at BookCon with ​her lavender cane. ​She is wearing a rainbow dress with books all over it.

What I Wish People Knew About Being a Young Cane User

Although Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, the genetic connective tissue disorder I have, is lifelong, my symptoms have varied throughout my life. I started using a cane in August or September 2016 to help with balance, stability, stamina, and chronic pain. I don’t
A black and white blurred photo of protestors. Only their arms are visible.

Social Justice Activists Can’t Always Fight for Everything, and That’s Okay

Whenever I have strength to walk around my neighborhood, I often find myself reflecting on how I got to where I’m at now. In comparison to a few years ago, my life is drastically better than I expected it to
Photo of 3 disabled Asian American women, Mia Mingus, Alice Wong and Sandy Ho (from left to right). Mia is wearing glasses and large hoop earrings. Alice is wearing a brightly colored scarf and an army-camouflage-print jacket. She is wearing a mask over her nose with a tube for her Bi-Pap machine. Sandy has wavy short hair and is wearing a black sweater. Behind them is a concrete wall with a door.

On Valentine’s Day, Let’s Recognize Why #AccessIsLove

Roses, chocolates, galentines…there is a lot of emphasis on love for people in our personal lives this time of year. I could cry into my glass of rosé over the lack of romance in my life but instead,
The word story spelled out in wooden letters, surrounded by other randomized wooden letters.

The Power of Storytelling in Times Like These

As the world around me grows ever more entrenched in the horrors of climate change, political repression, and capitalist growth, my fear grows alongside it. Every day I hear more about the terrors that oppressed communities are facing. With each
Drawing of silhouettes of two heads, showing the exchange of gears and other information symbols, and a lightbulb between them

#ThingsDisabledPeopleKnow is Necessary Because Realistic Disability Representation is Scarce

Recently, I wrote about the most recent instance of “cripping up,” or disabled mimicry, in the film The Upside. Many people were angered by my post and couldn’t imagine why I would be so bold as to critique Bryan Cranston
Photo of a young person playing drums. The person's face is not visible, but they are positioned behind the drum set.

How My Parents Helped Me Find My Disabled Identity

I have always loved the way drums sound. During parades, my focus was always on the marchers with the snares; while at concerts my neck was perpetually craned as I struggled to see over the taller members of the crowd
A cup of tea and pot of honey, a notebook and pen, and a blanket resting artfully on a bed, indicating relaxation.

Slowing Down and Embracing Surgical Recovery is Still Living

I am working through one of those once a half-decade-or-so massive health shifts that folks with any chronic condition may find familiar: a rapid shift in function, surgery to implant more metal bits in me that set off alarms whenever…