Image of Daisy walking with two friends, Daisy is in the middle of the group. On the back of the person on the left is the gay flag. On the back of the person on the right is the trans flag.

Crip Queer Pride with Daisy Wislar

So often, disabled people are bombarded with media representation, cultural narratives, and stereotypes that stigmatize disability as just an unfavorable medical condition. But this couldn’t be less true! Disability is an identity in its own right, and Daisy shares their
Solid black background with a rainbow heart to the right with the wheelchair logo in the center. To the left of the heart is the following text: #CripQueerPride Twitter Chat. Thursday, August 29, 3pm Pacific / 6pm Eastern. Hosted by @RootedinRights @DaisThinks RootedinRights.org/CripQueerPride

#CripQueerPride Twitter Chat

Archive of Twitter chat Owning one’s disability identity means fighting against narratives and stereotypes that provides a limited understanding of what disability is beyond the medical labels. Our Storyteller Daisy (@DaisThinks) shares how coming into their identity made
Photo of Alaina and Macey holding each other in front of tree trunks.

Celebrating My LGBTQ+ Pride Helped Me Find Disability Pride

My first display of public LGBTQ+ pride was the rainbow pin that I attached to my purse in middle school: In the center, a pink triangle with text that read “Out Loud” and rainbow stripes that radiated outward from the
Photo of Yolanda in a black dress and pink scarf sitting in a manual wheelchair

Inclusion of Disabled People in the LGBTQ+ Community is About More Than Accessibility

Accessibility at major Queer events like Pride is extremely important to disabled LGBT2SQQAAIP (Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender Two Spirit Queer Questioning Aromantic Asexual Intersex Pansexual) people, and many of us are willing to provide guidance to help make it happen.…
artistic splatter illustration of a person swimming

Showing Up in Public in a Disabled Trans Body

The first time I limped out of the men’s locker room and into the YMCA indoor swimming pool area without a rash guard covering my surgery-scarred chest, I felt queasy. I was certain it would turn into an 80’s high…
Trans pride flag and LGBTQ pride flag waving on a flagpole in front of trees

Why We All Need to Fight for the Rights of Transgender Disabled People

It’s a difficult time to be disabled in America. We are stretched thin, fighting for our lives on multiple fronts. And when your own house is on fire, it’s understandable to feel that you lack the resources to fight for…
A profile of a person in a surrealist, rainbow-colored painting

Embracing My Queer, Disabled Identity

I realized I am not straight my junior year of college. I had a massive crush on my friend, a girl. I still liked guys, though, so I figured I was bisexual, or pansexual, or whatever you want to use…
Transgender flag pattern on the fabric texture

Navigating the Twists and Turns of Healthcare as a Trans Disabled Person

Statistics on the transgender community are hard to come by — we can’t even agree on how many people in the United States are trans. We do know, however, that trans people experience significant health care disparities, particularly in…
A trolley with people on it in rolling through a march.

Picture This: a Disability Community That’s Truly Inclusive of All

Close your eyes and picture a disabled person. At work, one of my jobs is finding images to pair with our weekly newsletter articles. Since we are a non-profit that advocates for people with disabilities, I often find myself combing…