Photo of 3 disabled Asian American women, Mia Mingus, Alice Wong and Sandy Ho (from left to right). Mia is wearing glasses and large hoop earrings. Alice is wearing a brightly colored scarf and an army-camouflage-print jacket. She is wearing a mask over her nose with a tube for her Bi-Pap machine. Sandy has wavy short hair and is wearing a black sweater. Behind them is a concrete wall with a door.

On Valentine’s Day, Let’s Recognize Why #AccessIsLove

Roses, chocolates, galentines…there is a lot of emphasis on love for people in our personal lives this time of year. I could cry into my glass of rosé over the lack of romance in my life but instead,
Laura Kiesel sits in her power chair and speaks into a microphone, next to another speaker on a stage in front of an audience.

The Disability Intersectionality Summit: A Gathering for Justice

On a damp and chilly Saturday in mid-October, I rolled out of bed several hours earlier than I usually would have in order to attend the biannual Disability Intersectionality Summit in nearby Cambridge, Mass on the MIT campus. Groggy but
A person in a wheelchair holding folders and a pen

Identifying as “Disabled” Brings Me Peace in a World Hostile to My Existence

Before I entered college, I never thought about disability. Or at least, I never thought about it with that exact word. Mental illness. Mentally ill. Disorder. Burden. These were all words I used to describe myself before “disabled” and “disability”
Boy in wheelchair with classmates at school

Empower Your Students Through Disability-Conscious Teaching

Historically, disabled people have been subjected to isolated, segregated education. And there’s still a notion that a disabled person in the classroom is a shocking and novel thing, and disabled people don’t belong in school. In a classroom space where…
Quote by Kate Ryan: "I am a piece of china with a large chip – I am broken but I am whole.  I am a body that functions as best I can." To the left is dark blue porcelain mug with white polka dots. The mug is chipped.

My Disabilities Make Me Both Broken and Whole

A dichotomy is defined as a contrast between two things.  It is two stones with a gulf between them, two planets on opposite sides of the sun, two opinions, two political parties, two opposites.  And in my case, one person. …
A stage with bright red spotlights shining from it. Crowd of people all standing in front of the stage, some with hands up.

28 Years After the ADA, Disabled People are Still Fighting for Accessible Event Seating

This winter, my friends and I bought tickets to see “50 Shades Freed,” because hate-watching and laughing at the franchise’s terrible movies is a tradition that we started when the first film premiered for Valentine’s Day. When we got to…
A pile of newspapers spread out over one another. The text is blurred and unreadable.

If You’re Writing About Disability, You Need to Read These Guidelines

Sometimes I imagine what the media’s typical coverage of disability might say if it was written about me—covering the two proms I went to with my girlfriend in high school, celebrating my ability to graduate from college after almost failing
A supporting hand waves in front of a rainbow flag flying on the sidelines of a summer gay pride parade

It’s Time for LGBQTIA+ Communities to Celebrate Disabled People

LGBQTIA+ spaces are supposed to be environments where we can be our true, authentic selves without stress. Where we can revel in being surrounded by our people, feeling safe and at home; places of queer joy, shared rage and frustration,…
Alaina, a white thin femme person, standing in front of a crowd at Pride in Boston. She is wearing a dress with rainbow castles all over it. I have long hair that is dark brown on top and a mix of blues and purples on the bottom. She is standing with hert lavender cane with a rainbow flag attached to it, and smiling.

If Your LGBTQIA+ Pride Event Isn’t Accessible to Disabled People, You’re Missing Out.

Like many other disabled people, one of the first questions I ask when I’m making plans is, “Will this be accessible?” And as much as I love going to celebrate at Pride events, the answer is often, “No, or pretty